Predicting the pandemic’s psychological toll: why suicide modelling is so difficult

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The Conversation | May 29, 2020

We’ve recently heard experts raise concerns about a looming mental health crisis, warning COVID-19’s psychological toll on Australians could be like a second wave of the pandemic.

Suicide modelling from the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre has predicted a potential 25-50% increase in the number of people taking their lives in Australia over the next five years. The researchers expect this projected increase to disproportionately affect younger people.

Any suicide is a tragedy and prevention must be a priority.Read More »

Mental illness and the psychological trap – a political problem

Amandla Ulutsha Newsletter |Issue 11 Editorial | 17 May 2018

The problem with society and the framing of mental illness as a social ill.

Mental illness is a serious problem, reaching epidemic status, and the problem is increasing rapidly amongst young people not only in South Africa but globally. There is a tendency in society to either: (1) disregard mental illness as a serious problem, or (2) to recognise mental illness as a problem but fail to treat the underlying causes that result in mental illness. In this piece we will attempt to explain why this is the case, and what needs to be done about it.Read More »

Climate change takes toll from mental health

American Psychological Association | 31 March, 2017

Source: Internet

When people think about climate change, they probably think first about its effects on the environment, and possibly on their physical health. But climate change also takes a significant toll on mental health, finds Mental Health and Our Changing Climate: Impacts, Implications, and Guidance, a new report released by the American Psychological Association and ecoAmerica.

Climate change-induced severe weather and other natural disasters have the most immediate effects on mental health in the form of the trauma and shock due to personal injuries, loss of a loved one, damage to or loss of personal property or even the loss of livelihood, according to the report. Terror, anger, shock and other intense negative emotions that can dominate people’s initial response may eventually subside, only to be replaced by post-traumatic stress disorder.Read More »