FARMERS’ ONGOING MOVEMENT IN INDIA

Six Months of Farmers’ Protest At Delhi Border

Harsh Thakor

Countercurrents | May 27, 2021

There could hardly have been a better celebration of six months of the Delhi farmers protest at Tikri border in Delhi completed today, with the flag of liberation shimmering at a crescendo, on the call for a bandh of Samyukti Kisan Morcha.An impact of an inferno or intensity of coal burning in a furnace was displayed at Tikri border by the farmers in the May 26th protest by Bharatiya Kisan Union(Ugrahan).It was remarkable the manner it galvanised all the forces to crystallise such an event. The volume of revolutionary resistance was sung at it’s highest pitch, with the morale of a victorious army.Read More »

NEW BOOK 

Dario Azzellini (Ed.)

More than a labor dispute!

Workers worldwide against authoritarianism, fascism and dictatorship
A publication by the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation

248 pages | 2021 | EUR 16.80
ISBN 978-3-96488-081-9

Short text:  Encouragement in the face of global disorder: Examples from numerous countries on different continents show the central role of the organized working population in the struggle against authoritarianism, fascism and dictatorship.

An English-language edition will be published in May 2021 with the title If Not Us, Who?Read More »

PEOPLE’S PROTEST IN COLOMBIA

Colombians set to defy May Day protest ban

Morning Star | April 30, 2021

Protesters hold signs that read in Spanish “No to tax reform” during a national strike against a government-proposed tax reform, in Bogota, Colombia

TRADE unions, student organisations and civil society groups in Colombia are set to defy a government ban on May Day demonstrations by taking to the streets in protest at unpopular tax changes.

This follows days of strike action “for life, peace, democracy” and against an economic reform package being pushed by President Ivan Duque, which unions warn will have a devastating impact on the country’s poor.Read More »

WORKERS STRIKE IN U.S. 

Massachusetts Nurses Face Down For-Profit Health Care Giant Tenet in Daring Strike

Sarah Hughes

Labour Notes | April 13, 2021

Two nurses hold a green St. Patrick's Day banner that reads "And the righteous did cast out the evil from the land." The banner pictures a group of nurses chasing off a snake labeled Tenet.
Nurses at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Worcester, Massachusetts, have been on strike since March 8. Their number one issue: safe staffing ratios. The hospital is owned by the for-profit health care conglomerate Tenet, which made $400 million in profits in 2020. Photo: Massachusetts Nurses Association
On the same day that their employer announced it had made more than $400 million in profits during the Covid-19 pandemic, the nurses of St. Vincent Hospital in Worcester, Massachusetts, declared their intention to strike.

“St. V’s” is part of the Dallas-based Tenet Health—one of the largest and most profitable for-profit hospital corporations in the country. It is refusing to back down on the number one issue for nurses: safe staffing ratios.

As of this writing, close to 90 percent of the 800 nurses have been on strike since March 8.Read More »

KILL THE BILL MOVEMENT IN UK

‘Kill the Bill’ protest to go ahead in Bristol city centre tonight

It will be the seventh protest in three weeks against the Government’s Police Bill

Tristan Cork

Bristol Live | April 09, 2021

https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/kill-bill-protest-go-ahead-5281484

A seventh protest in Bristol against the Government’s proposed Police and Crime Bill is set to go ahead this evening.

Details of the protest, which has no official organisers, are being circulated on social media, with the call to gather on College Green in Bristol city centre again at 6pm.Read More »

WORKERS PROTEST

How a Janitors Union in San Francisco Got Over Its Fear and Struck

Luis Feliz Leon

Labor Notes | April 08, 2021

People in masks and purple SEIU 87 shirts picket in front of a bright window. Central person has a bullhorn. Others carry "ON STRIKE" signs and wear reflective vests.
Striking janitors picketed the huge Salesforce Tower and other office buildings, as tech workers begin to trickle back after months of remote work. Roughly 3,000 Bay Area janitors were laid off last year. They want everyone rehired, with improved ventilation and protective gear. Photo: SEIU Local 87
With their contract negotiations stalled, hundreds of San Francisco janitors represented by Service Employees (SEIU) Local 87 went on strike March 24.

Roughly 3,000 Bay Area janitors were laid off as the pandemic spread last year. Their union is now demanding a return to work for all laid-off workers—but with improvements.

They want better ventilation in buildings, protective gear for workers, a wage increase, health coverage, additional sick days, and protections against sexual harassment for a workforce that is largely immigrant women of color.Read More »

U.S. IMPERIALISM 

“Stop Interfering in Our Lives”: Haitians Protesters Condemn US Support for Dictator

Alan Macleod

MintPress News | February 15, 2021

Haiti Feature photo

After five years of highly contentious rule, Haitian president Jovenel Moïse was scheduled to finally step down last week. However, his announcement that he would stay in office for (at least) one more year brought fresh impetus to nationwide protests that have continued almost unbroken since 2018. The protests have led to hundreds of deaths yet have drawn little attention in the West, largely because Moïse continues to be a loyal U.S. ally.Read More »

INDIAN FARMERS’ MOVEMENT 

The Unraveling of A Script In Two Parts And Writing A New Script By Farmers

Amit Bhaduri and Chaman Lal

Frontier | January 30, 2021

The script of collaboration is in two parts. The first part was written long ago when the once revolutionary Vinayak Damodar Savarkar was released after long years from prison in the Andamans. He collaborated with the British as he had promised in several petitions for mercy he had written to the British authorities from jail. In what psychologists describe as ‘transferred anxiety’ he seemed to have transferred his hatred of the colonial British power to a hatred of fellow Indian Muslims. Since then, Guru Golwalkar and others in the RSS took this agenda forward. They all stayed away from the then anti-colonial struggle, and joined neither its non-violent stream led by Gandhi nor its violent stream led by martyrs like Bhagat Singh or Subhas Bose.

In a curious similarity the one-time revolutionary Savarkar became a collaborationist of the British, while Jinnah, a one-time resolute secular nationalist Congress leader who had stood firm even against the Khilafat movement because of its religious overtones, came to depend increasingly on the British for helping the Muslim minority against a majoritarian Hindu nationalism.  Both Savarkar and Jinnah who had started as secular political leaders ended their careers as leaders whose politics were defined by the religion they championed.Read More »