HM Online 2021: States and Geo-Politics

Regimes of Extreme Permission? State-corporate repression and the realization of neocolonial accumulation in SE Asia
Joe Greener and Pablo Ciocchini, University of Liverpool in Singapore

Agency in the Periphery: the controversy between Marini and Cardoso in Geopolitical terms
Rafael Alexandre Mello, University of Brasília
Pedro Salgado, Federal University of Bahia and University of Brasília

Conceptualising institutional disobedience in a context of authoritarian neoliberalism: The Catalan case
Monica Clua-Losada, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
Clara Camps Calvet, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain
Shaun McCrory, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA

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China: Imperialism or Semi-Periphery?

Minqi Li

“China is currently the world’s largest economy measured by purchasing power parity. As the rapid expansion of the Chinese economy reshapes the global geopolitical map, Western mainstream media has begun to define China as a new imperialist power that exploits cheap energy and raw materials from developing countries. Some Marxist intellectuals and political groups, drawing from the Leninist theory of imperialism, argue that the rise of monopoly Chinese capital and its rapid expansion in the world market have turned China into a capitalist imperialistic country.
Whether China has become an imperialist country is a question of crucial importance for the global class struggle. I argue that although China has developed an exploitative relationship with South Asia, Africa, and other raw material exporters, on the whole, China continues to transfer a greater amount of surplus value to the core countries in the capitalist world system than it receives from the periphery. China is thus best described as a semi-peripheral country in the capitalist world system.
The real question is not whether China has become imperialistic, but whether China will advance into the core of the capitalist world system in the foreseeable future. Because of the structural barriers of the capitalist world system, it is unlikely that China will become a member of the core. However, if China does manage to become a core country, the extraction of labor and energy resources required will impose an unbearable burden on the rest of the world. It is doubtful that such a development can be made compatible with either the stability of the existing world system or the stability of the global ecological system.

Read more: https://monthlyreview.org/2021/07/01/china-imperialism-or-semi-periphery/?fbclid=IwAR2BkC3VMGmtF-ozyxR6nALW6et5h68ZBUSef9zi3_bpyzKqJnDjo3a8ipY

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Samir Amin on centre, periphery and the world economy: an appreciation of his original insights

by Peter Lawrence

Pambazuka News | August 23, 2018

Credits: estoril

Samir Amin, already a major figure in the political economy of development, was the author of the first article in the first ever issue of ROAPE, in 1974. As the editorial noted, the article was “a summary of his basic model of the workings of the international system as a whole, presented at length in his two recent books” (the two- volume Accumulation on a World Scale, Monthly Review Press, 1974).

 

The editorial continued: “It provides us with an ideal starting point: a general view of international capitalism, identifying the crucial differences in the dynamic of accumulation at the centre and at the periphery: differences which promote development in the metropoles and inhibit it in Africa. It is our hope that his work, which represents the most significant African contribution to the debate on underdevelopment, will be studied widely and discussed critically.”

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