How Much Less Newsworthy Are Civilians in Other Conflicts?

A lot less, particularly when they’re victims of the US

Julie Hollar

Fair | March 18, 2022

Jeff Cohen (Common Dreams2/28/22): “Unfortunately, there was virtually no focus on civilian death and agony when it was the US military launching the invasions.”

As US news media covered the first shocking weeks of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, some media observers—like FAIR founder Jeff Cohen (Common Dreams2/28/22)—have noted their impressions of how coverage differed from wars past, particularly in terms of a new focus on the impact on civilians.

To quantify and deepen these observations, FAIR studied the first week of coverage of the Ukraine war (2/24–3/2/22) on ABC World News TonightCBS Evening News and NBC Nightly News. We used the Nexis news database to count both sources (whose voices get to be heard?) and segments (what angles are covered?) about Ukraine during the study period. Comparing this coverage to that of other conflicts reveals both a familiar reliance on US officials to frame events, as well as a newfound ability to cover the impact on civilians—when those civilians are white and under attack by an official US enemy, rather than by the US itself.

Ukrainian sourcesno experts

One of the most striking things about early coverage has been the sheer number of Ukrainian sources. FAIR always challenges news media to seek out the perspective of those most impacted by events, and US outlets are doing so to a much greater extent in this war than in any war in recent history. Of 234 total sources—230 of whom had identifiable nationalities—119 were Ukrainian (including five living in the United States.)

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Lies! Deception! Mainstream Media uses photos of pro-communist rallies in Cuba to illustrate articles on anti-government, pro-U.S. protests!

Alan MacLeod tweets: A ton of corporate media, including the Financial Times, Fox News, The New York Times and The Guardian have used a pic of a PRO-govt rally in Cuba to illustrate their articles on anti-government protests, falsely claiming the huge crowds to be on the side of the US.

[THIS IS POSTED HERE FOR NON-PROFIT, NON-COMMERCIAL, EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE.]
MEDIA

We Can Defeat the Corporate Media’s War to Snuff Out Independent Journalism

 

Jonathan Cook

My talk at the International Festival of Whistleblowing, Dissent and Accountability on May 8. Transcript below.

I wanted to use this opportunity to talk about my experiences over the past two decades working with new technology as an independent freelance journalist, one who abandoned — or maybe more accurately, was abandoned by — what we usually call the “mainstream” media.

Looking back over that period, I have come to appreciate that I was among the first generation of journalists to break free of the corporate media — in my case, the Guardian — and ride this wave of new technology. In doing so, we liberated ourselves from the narrow editorial restrictions such media imposes on us as journalists and were still able to find an audience, even if a diminished one.Read More »

Corporate Media Target Gabbard for Her Anti-Interventionism—a Word They Can Barely Pronounce

by Owen Walsh

FAIR MEDIA MONITOR | May 08, 2019

Tulsi Gabbard being challenged on The View (2/20/19) by Ana Navarro: “Why are you so against intervention in Venezuela?”

Presidential hopeful Tulsi Gabbard has not garnered much press coverage since announcing her bid on February 2; she’s the 13th-most-mentioned Democratic candidate on TV news, according to FAIR’s most recent count (4/14/19).

But when corporate media do talk about the Hawaii congressmember, they tend to reveal more about themselves than about her.

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Net neutrality repeal is only part of Trump’s surrender to corporate media

by Reed Richardson

FAIR | December 14, 2017

Net Neutrality Repeal Is Only Part of Trump’s Surrender to Corporate Media

The FCC is under attack—and so too is the First Amendment. As the primary regulator of how media and information gets to our nation’s citizens, the Federal Communications Commission has a critical role to play in protecting the open Internet, free speech, and free press in our democracy. Though the agency has always enjoyed a cozy relationship with the industries it regulates, ever since the Trump administration arrived in Washington, the FCC’s mission to preserve the public commons has been threatened, assaulted and torn asunder. And like a bad horror movie cliché, these calls to eviscerate the FCC have been coming from inside the agency.Read More »