Toward a New World: Articles and Essays, 1901-1906

On the Psychology of Society; New World, and Contributions to Studies in the Realist Worldview

Bogdanov Library, Volume: 245/3
Historical Materialism Book Series, Volume: 245/3

Author: Alexander Aleksandrovich Bogdanov
Editor / Translator: David Rowley

BRILL

Cover Toward a New World: Articles and Essays, 1901-1906

Alexander Bogdanov (1873–1928) wrote the articles in this volume in the years before and during the Revolution of 1905 when he was co-leader, with V.I. Lenin, of the Bolshevik faction of the Russian Social-Democratic Labour Party, and was active in the revolution and the struggle against Marxist revisionism. In these pieces, Bogdanov defends the principles of revolutionary Social-Democracy on the basis of a neutral monist philosophy (empiriomonism), the idea of the invariable regularity of nature, and the use of the principle of selection to explain social development. The articles in On the Psychology of Society (1904/06) discredit the neo-Kantian philosophy of Russia’s Marxist revisionists, rebut their critique of historical materialism, and develop the idea that labour technology determines social consciousness. New World (1905) envisions how humankind will develop under socialism, and Bogdanov’s contributions to Studies in the Realist Worldview (1904/05) defend the labour theory of value and criticise neo-Kantian sociology.

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October Revolution in Russia: A Timeline

104 Years Ago: The October Revolution in Pictures

IN PICTURES: The Bolsheviks seized the Winter Palace 104 years ago in 1917, paving the way for the establishment of the world’s first socialist state. This piece was published by the teleSUR on November 06, 2017.

A brilliant Marxist theorist and politician, Bolshevik leader Vladimir Lenin galvanized support among workers and peasants.
A BRILLIANT MARXIST THEORIST AND POLITICIAN, BOLSHEVIK LEADER VLADIMIR LENIN GALVANIZED SUPPORT AMONG WORKERS AND PEASANTS.PHOTO:WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Under the revolutionary leadership of Vladimir Lenin, the Petrograd Soviet, the Bolshevik Red Guards and masses of workers occupied and seized government buildings on Nov. 7, 1917, decisively taking the Winter Palace and toppling the Provisional Government.

Although the February Revolution had ousted the hated Tsarist monarchy, the Provisional Government that took over was incapable of meeting the needs of the people for “Peace, Bread and Land,” leading Lenin to argue for its ouster as well.

The armed, but nearly bloodless insurrection, paved the way for the establishment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the world’s first socialist state.

Immediately after taking power, the new revolutionary government held elections for a constituent assembly and began the process of nationalizing private property and industry to build socialism in what had only months before been a semi-feudal society.

The Petrograd Soviet and Bolshevik Red Guards, backed by workers, stormed the Winter Palace, taking it without much difficulty.
THE PETROGRAD SOVIET AND BOLSHEVIK RED GUARDS, BACKED BY WORKERS, STORMED THE WINTER PALACE, TAKING IT WITHOUT MUCH DIFFICULTY. PHOTO:WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
The Winter Palace was taken with little violence.
THE WINTER PALACE WAS TAKEN WITH LITTLE VIOLENCE. PHOTO:WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
Bolshevik Women
BOLSHEVIK WOMEN’S BATTALION STANDS GUARD AFTER THE WINTER PALACE WAS SEIZED. PHOTO:WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
Faced with impending defeat, the last guards of the Winter Palace under the Provisional Government stand watch.
FACED WITH IMPENDING DEFEAT, THE LAST GUARDS OF THE WINTER PALACE UNDER THE PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT STAND WATCH. PHOTO:WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
Workers gathering outside the Winter Palace.
WORKERS GATHERING OUTSIDE THE WINTER PALACE. PHOTO:WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
A Bolshevik Red Guard unit in 1917.
A BOLSHEVIK RED GUARD UNIT IN 1917. PHOTO:WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

SOURCE: https://www.telesurtv.net/english/multimedia/100-Years-Ago-The-October-Revolution-in-Pictures-20171030-0022.html

[THIS ARTICLE IS POSTED HERE FOR NON-PROFIT, NON-COMMERCIAL, EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE]

Healthcare Under Socialism: The History of the Soviet Healthcare System

POLITSTURM | September 07, 2021

Healthcare Under Socialism: The History of the Soviet Healthcare System

There are a lot of discussions on the healthcare systems today. Capitalist ideologists try their best to prove that the state healthcare system is too expensive and can not be implemented. But history proved them wrong. How did socialism change the approach to the management of healthcare?

As a result of the October Revolution of 1917, an entirely new state was created in place of the Russian Empire, establishing a proletarian dictatorship. For the first time in history, the country’s resources and means of production were in the hands of the majority of the population, rather than a narrow stratum of the nobility and bourgeoisie. It was a state with different principles of development and a unique communist ideology.

As far back as 1903, Vladimir Lenin outlined the objectives of the state in the sphere of health protection in the 1st Program of the RSDLP. It stressed the necessity of establishing an 8-hour working day, banning child labor, arrangement of crèches in factories, state insurance for workers, sanitary supervision in factories, etc.  But like any new country, Soviet Russia was faced with many problems in all spheres which had to be solved as effectively and promptly as possible. And one of the most serious problems was the lack of a healthcare system.

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The Bolshevik Revolution’s Pioneering Gains for Women

Granma | November 06, 2017

The women

The women’s demonstration for bread, land and peace on March 8, 1917 in Petrograd was the beginning of the end of Tsarist Russia. | Photo: Wikimedia Commons
The first worker’s state in the world would never have materialized without the steely, militant determination of women.

“Bread!” was the first call to order. “Down with the tsar!” the next. Soon, cries of “Down with the war!” drowned the streets.

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Smolny on the Night of the Storm

by Anatoly Lunacharsky

Source: Internet

Smolny was brightly lit from top to bottom. Crowds of excited people were hurrying back and forth along its many corridors. There was great animation everywhere, but the most impetuous human stream, a real flood of impassioned people, was the one that made its way towards the end of the corridor on the top floor, where, in the most remote back room of all, the Military Revolutionary Committee was in session. The girls in the outer room, worn out though they were, struggled heroically to deal with the unbelievable crush of people who came for explanations and instructions or with all sorts of requests and complaints. Once you got caught up in this human maelstrom you found yourself surrounded by faces flushed with excitement and hands outstretched to receive some order or some mandate.Read More »

“Democracy” in the Political Consciousness of the February Revolution

by Boris Ivanovich Kolonitskii

Translated by Christopher K. Cosner

Slavic Review, Vol. 57, No. 1 (Spring, 1998), pp. 95-106

[EXCERPTS FROM THE ESSAY]

Source: Internet

Historians of quite diverging orientations have interpreted the February revolution of 1917 in Russia as a “democratic” revolution. Several generations of Marxists of various stripes (tolk) have called it a “bourgeois-democratic revolution.” In the years of perestroika, the contrast between democratic February and Bolshevik October became an important part of the historical argument of the anticommunist movement. The February revolution was regarded as a dramatic, unsuccessful attempt at the modernization and westernization of Russia, as its democratization. Such a point of view was expressed even earlier in some historical works and in the memoirs of participants in the events-liberals and moderate socialists. For example, just such a description of the revolution is given by Aleksandr Kerenskii, Whose last reminiscences are especially significant. Kerenskii thought that “the overwhelming majority of the Russian population … were wholeheartedly democratic in their beliefs.” (A. F. Kerensky, Russia and History’s Turning Point, New York, 1965, 326)Read More »

Revolution Revisited

By Barun Das Gupta

Frontier | Autumn Number, Vol. 48, No. 14 – 17, Oct 11 – Nov 7, 2015

 

Two years from now, in 2017, communists all over the world will observe the centenary of the October Socialist Revolution (OSR) in Russia. In the last one hundred years two important developments have taken place. During the closing decades of the nineteenth century and the first two and a half decades of the twentieth century, socialism as a political ideology and as a movement was growing from strength to strength. It culminated in the overthrow of Tsardom in Russia and conquest of power by the Bolsheviks or communists under Lenin. For the first time in the history of civilization, the poor, the deprived and the dispossessed captured state power and set out to create a new, classless and exploitation-free society. But the closing decade of the twentieth century saw the collapse of the Soviet Union and the People’s Democracies of Eastern Europe and restoration of capitalism in what was usually called the ‘socialist world’.Read More »