A Few Lines From Young Marx

by

Countercurrents.org | May 05, 2017

marx-young

It was 1830, the July Revolution forced abdication of king Charles X in France, and Louis Philippe became constitutional monarch. Twenty-eight years prior to this development in France, in 1802, the first factory law was introduced in England; and the law pertained to child labor. In the same year, John Dalton introduced atomic theory into chemistry. In the Congress of Vienna in 1814-’15, Metternich of Austria, Talleyrand of France, Alexander I of Russia, Frederick William I of Prussia and Castlereagh of England attempted to attain balance of power in Europe, reestablished monarchies, redrew their boundaries to the advantage of Prussia, Austria and Russia, organized German Confederation. British conquest of Dutch and French colonies was recognized. Works by the Young Germany writers were banned in Germany. But the reactionaries failed to stop spread of liberal ideas. On December 7, 1835, the first German train powered by a steam engine completed its journey of 7 kilometers in 12 minutes from Nuremberg to Furth.Read More »

From the editors: On this May Day, May 1, the International Labor Day, Journal of People, Peasants and Workers greets its readers and well-wishers. Journal of People was initiated on this day also. On its founding anniversary JoP thanks its readers and well-wishers for the support they have extended.    

Bicycle Bicentenary Year 2017: Bicycle and Women’s Liberation

by T. Vijayendra

Frontier | 04 March, 2017

Source: Internet

Bicycling and Feminism
One hundred years ago, Alice Hawkins, a suffragette, cycled around Leicester (UK) promoting the women’s rights movement, causing outrage by being one of the first ladies to wear pantaloons in the city. During the fight to win the vote the bicycle became not only a tool but also a symbol for the emancipation of women.

The American civil rights leader, Susan B Anthony, wrote in 1896:
“Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think [the bicycle] has done more to emancipate women than any one thing in the world. I rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a bike. It gives her a feeling of self-reliance and independence the moment she takes her seat; and away she goes, the picture of untrammelled womanhood.”Read More »

Robotic Reminder Of What It Is To Be Human

by Susan Darlington

ROBOTS in art usually want to kill humans or become more like them through artificial intelligence.

But the success of Pipeline Theatre’s Spillikin is that it places a physically and emotionally static robot as the touchstone for a moving meditation on human change.

Designed as a companion for Sally (Judy Norman) by her now-dead husband Raymond, the robot is programmed with memories of her partner.

Struggling with dementia, Sally first resents the imposition and then, as she grows increasingly confused, accepts and crosses the border of acceptability, putting her husband’s glasses on the robot and holding its hand.Read More »

Return to Roots

A Journal of People report

A person in the United States has found a new life as he has gone back to farming, a root he feels.
An NPR report said:
“Eighteen years ago, on New Year’s Eve, David Fisher visited an old farm in western Massachusetts, near the small town of Conway. No one was farming there at the time, and that’s what had drawn Fisher to the place. He was scouting for farmland.
“‘I remember walking out [to the fallow fields] at some point,’ Fisher recalls. ‘And in the moonlight – it was all snowy – it was like a blank canvas.’
“On that blank canvas, Fisher’s mind painted a picture of what could be there alongside the South River. He could see horses tilling the land – no tractors, no big machinery – and vegetable fields, and children running around.Read More »

Fidel’s concept of Revolution

The concept of Revolution as expressed by the late leader of the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro Ruz, on May 1, 2000

by  

Granma | 05 December, 2016

                                Photo: http://www.radiocubana.cu

“Revolution is having a sense of the historic moment; it is changing everything that must be changed; it is full equality and freedom; it is being treated and treating others like human beings; it is emancipating ourselves on our own and through our own efforts; it is challenging powerful dominant forces in and beyond the social and national arena; it is defending the values in which we believe at the price of any sacrifice; it is modesty, selflessness, altruism, solidarity, and heroism; it is fighting with courage, intelligence and realism; it is never lying or violating ethical principles; it is a profound conviction that there is no power in the world that can crush the power of truth and ideas. Revolution is unity; it is independence, it is struggling for our dreams of justice for Cuba and for the world, which is the foundation of our patriotism, our socialism, and our internationalism.”

Protests Head Into Fourth Day as Sanders Urges Trump ‘Heed the Views of Progressives’

by Andrea Germanos, staff writer

Common Dreams | 12 November, 2016

Anti-Trump protesters hold signs outside Trump Hotel in Washington, D.C. on Thursday. (Photo: Lorie Shaull/flickr/cc)

As U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) urges the president-elect “to heed the views of progressives,” protests continue in cities across the U.S. on Saturday, with participants driven by “outrage and fear” over Donald Trump’s electoral victory.

Read More »

Note: Today, November 7, is the historic day that shook the world by the political action of the toilers in Russia. On this day proletariat in Russia opened a new horizon for all the exploited people in the world by organizing a successful proletarian revolution.
On this occasion, Journal of People posts excerpts from Ten Days that Shook the World, the classic book on the proletarian revolution in Russia, by John Reed, and a few decrees that the proletarian political power in Russia issued immediately after seizing power.
John Reed, (born: October 20, 1887, died: October 17, 1920) is a journalist from the US. He joined communists while reporting the proletarian revolution in Russia in 1917; and helped form the Communist Labour Party in the US in 1919. John Reed died of typhus in the Soviet Union. “Reed was tall, forceful, and matter-of-fact, with a cool idealism and a lively intelligence tinged by humour.”
As introduction of the classic, Lenin wrote at the end of 1919:
“With the greatest interest and with never slackening attention I read John Reed’s book, Ten Days that Shook the World. Unreservedly do I recommend it to the workers of the world. Here is a book which I should like to see published in millions of copies and translated into all languages. It gives a truthful and most vivid exposition of the events so significant to the comprehension of what really is the Proletarian Revolution and the Dictatorship of the Proletariat. These problems are widely discussed, but before one can accept or reject these ideas, he must understand the full significance of his decision. John Reed’s book will undoubtedly help to clear this question, which is the fundamental problem of the international labor movement.

Migration as Revolt against Capital

by Prabhat Patnaik

People’s Democracy | 09 October, 2016

The fact that a large number of refugees, especially from countries which have been subjected of late to the ravages of imperialist aggression and wars, are desperately trying to enter Europe is seen almost exclusively in humanitarian terms.  While this perception no doubt has validity, there is another aspect of the issue which has escaped attention altogether,namely that it is the first time in modern history that the issue of migration is being sought to be taken out of the exclusive control of metropolitan capital.  Until now migration streams have been dictated entirely by the requirements of metropolitan capital; now, for the first time, people are violating the dictates of metropolitan capital, and attempting to give effect to their own preferences in the matter of where they wish to settle.  Wretched and miserable, and without being conscious of the implications of their own actions, these hapless refugees are in effect voting with their feet against the hegemony of metropolitan capital, which invariably proceeds on the assumption that people would meekly submit to its dictates, including in the matter of where to live.Read More »