On the centenary of

the Great October Revolution

Journal of People 

greets all its readers and well-wishers. 

 

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Rambles Recollect

by Dipanjan Rai Chowdhuri

Frontier | Vol. 49, No.47, May 28 – Jun 3, 2017

I first met Charu Majumdar in 1968. Some students were going to a rural area for protracted political work and Charuda (Kaka, our leader, called him Charuda, and we usurped the name!) had agreed to a talk to orient their programme. At this time the supporters of Naxalbari were fragmented into sectarian groups. We did not belong to Charuda’s organisation, but the moment he started talking we understood he was speaking to us as our leader.

He said that our work was to take to the peasants the message of armed struggle to establish their own state . Organising economic struggles was not our task. The peasants might not listen to the message and start economic struggles. For example, they might want to take a deputation to the BDO to dig a culvert. You will say that nothing will come of this as far as changing  the nature of the state and the basic conditions of life of the people concerned, but you will accompany the peasant in his procession. The line presented here has been debated to bits but there can be little doubt that it was inspired by the mass line. He said nothing about the “annihilation” line.Read More »

Trump abandons science with climate walk-out

by Alex Kirby

Climate News Network | June 02, 2017

Rejecting science seems a strange way of hoping to make America great again.Image: Mark Nozell via Wikimedia Commons

LONDON, 2 June, 2017 – President Donald Trump abandons science with his decision to withdraw the US from the Paris Agreement on climate change, saying: “I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris” – a wonderfully clear statement of his inability to recognise that the Earth shares one atmosphere.Read More »

A Few Lines From Young Marx

by

Countercurrents.org | May 05, 2017

marx-young

It was 1830, the July Revolution forced abdication of king Charles X in France, and Louis Philippe became constitutional monarch. Twenty-eight years prior to this development in France, in 1802, the first factory law was introduced in England; and the law pertained to child labor. In the same year, John Dalton introduced atomic theory into chemistry. In the Congress of Vienna in 1814-’15, Metternich of Austria, Talleyrand of France, Alexander I of Russia, Frederick William I of Prussia and Castlereagh of England attempted to attain balance of power in Europe, reestablished monarchies, redrew their boundaries to the advantage of Prussia, Austria and Russia, organized German Confederation. British conquest of Dutch and French colonies was recognized. Works by the Young Germany writers were banned in Germany. But the reactionaries failed to stop spread of liberal ideas. On December 7, 1835, the first German train powered by a steam engine completed its journey of 7 kilometers in 12 minutes from Nuremberg to Furth.Read More »

From the editors: On this May Day, May 1, the International Labor Day, Journal of People, Peasants and Workers greets its readers and well-wishers. Journal of People was initiated on this day also. On its founding anniversary JoP thanks its readers and well-wishers for the support they have extended.    

Bicycle Bicentenary Year 2017: Bicycle and Women’s Liberation

by T. Vijayendra

Frontier | 04 March, 2017

Source: Internet

Bicycling and Feminism
One hundred years ago, Alice Hawkins, a suffragette, cycled around Leicester (UK) promoting the women’s rights movement, causing outrage by being one of the first ladies to wear pantaloons in the city. During the fight to win the vote the bicycle became not only a tool but also a symbol for the emancipation of women.

The American civil rights leader, Susan B Anthony, wrote in 1896:
“Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think [the bicycle] has done more to emancipate women than any one thing in the world. I rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a bike. It gives her a feeling of self-reliance and independence the moment she takes her seat; and away she goes, the picture of untrammelled womanhood.”Read More »

Robotic Reminder Of What It Is To Be Human

by Susan Darlington

ROBOTS in art usually want to kill humans or become more like them through artificial intelligence.

But the success of Pipeline Theatre’s Spillikin is that it places a physically and emotionally static robot as the touchstone for a moving meditation on human change.

Designed as a companion for Sally (Judy Norman) by her now-dead husband Raymond, the robot is programmed with memories of her partner.

Struggling with dementia, Sally first resents the imposition and then, as she grows increasingly confused, accepts and crosses the border of acceptability, putting her husband’s glasses on the robot and holding its hand.Read More »

Return to Roots

A Journal of People report

A person in the United States has found a new life as he has gone back to farming, a root he feels.
An NPR report said:
“Eighteen years ago, on New Year’s Eve, David Fisher visited an old farm in western Massachusetts, near the small town of Conway. No one was farming there at the time, and that’s what had drawn Fisher to the place. He was scouting for farmland.
“‘I remember walking out [to the fallow fields] at some point,’ Fisher recalls. ‘And in the moonlight – it was all snowy – it was like a blank canvas.’
“On that blank canvas, Fisher’s mind painted a picture of what could be there alongside the South River. He could see horses tilling the land – no tractors, no big machinery – and vegetable fields, and children running around.Read More »

Fidel’s concept of Revolution

The concept of Revolution as expressed by the late leader of the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro Ruz, on May 1, 2000

by  

Granma | 05 December, 2016

                                Photo: http://www.radiocubana.cu

“Revolution is having a sense of the historic moment; it is changing everything that must be changed; it is full equality and freedom; it is being treated and treating others like human beings; it is emancipating ourselves on our own and through our own efforts; it is challenging powerful dominant forces in and beyond the social and national arena; it is defending the values in which we believe at the price of any sacrifice; it is modesty, selflessness, altruism, solidarity, and heroism; it is fighting with courage, intelligence and realism; it is never lying or violating ethical principles; it is a profound conviction that there is no power in the world that can crush the power of truth and ideas. Revolution is unity; it is independence, it is struggling for our dreams of justice for Cuba and for the world, which is the foundation of our patriotism, our socialism, and our internationalism.”