The Indonesia Genocide 1965-66 by army: U.S. government’s “active support” of the slaughter

A Journal of People report

According to newly declassified documents posted on October 17, 2017 by the National Security Archive (NSA) at The George Washington University the U.S. government had detailed knowledge that the Indonesian Army was conducting a campaign of mass murder against the country’s Communist Party (PKI) starting in 1965.

The documents reveal not just the US government’s “detailed knowledge” of the Indonesian Army’s mass killings of members of the Communist Party (PKI), but its “active support” of the slaughter.Read More »

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TuNur in Tunisia: Another case of energy colonialism

by Hamza Hamouchene

Pambazuka News | September 07, 2017

A familiar ‘colonial’ scheme is being rolled out: the unrestricted flow of cheap natural resources from the Global South to the rich North, maintaining a profoundly unjust international division of labour. While fortress Europe builds walls and fences to prevent human beings from reaching its shores for sanctuary, it accepts no barriers to resource grabs.

When we hear news about renewable energy projects, one must be forgiven for thinking that it’s all beautiful and shiny. But scratching a little bit beneath the surface of this language of “cleanliness,” “shininess” and “carbon emission cuts” reveals another picture, a picture of big capital robbing land and resource rights from the Global South in order to safeguard energy security of the Global North.

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A critique of David Harvey’s analysis of imperialism

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MR Online | August 26, 2017

David Harvey

In an interview with Richard Seymour in the March 2017 issue of Monthly Review, interviewer Michael Yates, in a question about imperialism, pointed out that noted Marxist scholar David Harvey “claims that wealth in the rich nations is being drained by the countries of the Global South.”1 Specifically, Yates quoted Harvey:

Those of us who think the old categories of imperialism do not work too well in these times do not deny at all the complex flows of value that expand the accumulation of wealth and power in one part of the world at the expense of another. We simply think the flows are more complicated and constantly changing direction. The historical draining of wealth from East to West for more than two centuries, for example, has largely been reversed over the last thirty years.

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NYT claims U.S. opposed Honduran coup it actually supported

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ACTION ALERT: NYT Claims US Opposed Honduran Coup It Actually Supported

The August 14 New York Times reported that the threat by Donald Trump to use the US military against the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has brought together Latin American leaders, divided on other things, in opposition to US intervention.  Along the way, reporter Nicholas Casey cites a regional expert who says, “An often ugly history of US interventions is vividly remembered in Latin America — even as we in the US have forgotten.” Which the Times followed thus:Read More »

Drone warfare: The death of precision

by James Rogers

Bulletin of The Atomic Scientists | May 12, 2017

During the Obama presidency, precision was not just about hitting the right target, and it was more than mere accuracy. It was an ethos, one that enshrined the liberal-American desire to be just in times of war while still ensuring victory. Armed drones and the precision missiles they deployed were said to epitomize this desire. Drones were, the president stated, part of a “just war—a war waged proportionally, in last resort, and in self-defense.”

These claims were contentious. People such as Nobel laureate Desmond M. Tutu declared that these weapons undermined America’s “moral standards,” and non-governmental organizations such as Airwars—which monitors civilian casualties resulting from airstrikes in Iraq, Syria, and Libya—exposed the true cost of precision. For the Obama administration, though, drones continued to offer the alluring ability to kill at a distance while mitigating the cost to innocent life. Although mistakes were made, in an age when the United States led the world in the use of drones, these weapons appeared to offer a simple and unrivaled solution to the complexities of war.Read More »

An Interview With William Engdahl

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william-engdahl

The Ancient Greeks knew: “Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by rulers as useful.” No less a figure than the late Zbigniew Brzezinski and the CIA made use of this saying by recruiting the Muslim Brotherhood to fight a proxy war against the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, which led to the withdrawal of the Soviets from the Hindu Kush. Since then, the CIA used the mercenaries to fight more proxy wars in the Balkans, Chechnya, and Azerbaijan. Due to the wars of aggression against Iraq, Libya, Syria and Yemen the US and its vassal states created sectarian violence that led to civil wars. Right now, the CIA and the Muslim Brotherhood are present in the form of ISIS in Syria and Iraq.Read More »

Intervention: Inter-Parliamentary Union’s No To The imperialist Procedure [Part I]

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Countercurrents.org | May 17, 2017

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The Venezuela government has recently accused the US of financially propping up violent opposition groups in the country: Promoting an “unprecedented and systematic attempt” to intervene in the internal affairs of Venezuela. A statement of the foreign ministry of Venezuela said: “US financing and logistical support for violent groups in Venezuela have facilitated an armed sedition”. The statement added: “The US system of power relies on frequent and repeated statements, unilateral extraterritorial sanctions, economic financing of organizations in Venezuela for terrorist purposes, financial blockade, threats of military intervention […] to mask an open process of intervention marked by a rude meddling and violating international law.”Read More »

Intervention: Inter-Parliamentary Union’s No To The Imperialist Procedure – Part II

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Countercurrents.org | May 19, 2017

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The costs to be calculated

The most important part of these intervention-costs lacking in most of these calculations are the cost and price the intervened countries, the societies and the people in these countries had to pay/are paying. In any of the countries going through intervention process, there’s no scope of pursuing productive, democratic, and educational-cultural-intellectual activities in usual, normal way. “Libya War: The Unknown Costs and the Indemnified Interventionists” (Farooque Chowdhury, Countercurrents.org, June 30, 2015) discusses the costs in context of Libya.Read More »

Civil War—Fueled by US Bombs—Is Driving Yemen into Crisis.

Oxfam International | June 08, 2017

WASHINGTON – The Yemeni people are on the brink of famine after two years of conflict. In this time, millions of people have been displaced from their homes. And without adequate access to medical supplies or facilities, every ten minutes a child dies in Yemen due to preventable disease.

Yet at a time when the Yemeni people desperately need an end to violence, President Trump is proposing to sell nearly $510 million worth of weapons, including precision-guided munitions, to Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia’s use of these munitions in Yemen has fueled the conflict in Yemen, creating a humanitarian catastrophe. Tomorrow, Congress will vote on this arms deal that would be used to fuel the war in Yemen. The Yemeni people need peace – not more bombs.Read More »

‘Literal Colonialism’: Blackwater Founder Calls for ‘American Viceroy’ to Rule Afghanistan

by Jake Johnson, staff writer

Common Dreams | June 02, 2017

Despite the fact that private contractors have a long record of abuse and deadly criminality, Prince believes that they should have a stronger presence in Afghanistan. (Photo: Melissa Golden/Redux)

Displaying what one commentator called “sheer 19th century bloodlust and thirst for empire,” Erik Prince, founder of the private mercenary firm Blackwater, argued in The Wall Street Journal this week that the United States should deploy an “East India Company approach” in Afghanistan.

The country, he wrote, should be run by “an American viceroy who would lead all U.S. government and coalition efforts—including command, budget, policy, promotion, and contracting—and report directly to the president.”

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