The Great October Revolution: Punishment’s politics

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Countercurrents.org | December 11, 2017

october_revolution

Politics is not absent in the philosophy and culture of punishment ruling machines practice; and there’s nothing like class-neutral politics although a group of bookmen always suffer with annoyance and pain while they enter into discourse with issues like politics and punishment practiced by the poor and the exploited, and especially in case of the Great October Revolution. Punishment system is slanted in terms of class interest when it transects property and power. Punishment system in tsarist Russia was no exception; and the Great October Revolution had to weed that out, which was not a task of carrying with a stroke of a pen or through a few deliberations in legislative chamber or through mere pious wishes free from use of force, which a group of scholars dream and demand.Read More »

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Russian Revolution Centennial

 

by John Bachtell

Frontier | Vol. 50, No.24, Dec 17 – 23, 2017

October Revolution took place 100 years ago, on November 7, 1917. Even though the Soviet Union no longer exists, the revolution which gave birth to it reverberates still as one of the greatest history-changing events of the 20th century.

Millions of Russian workers and peasants engaged in an act of self-emancipation. Everything that followed provides those seeking a modern 21st century socialism a wealth of lessons, from both its achievements and mistakes.

The October Revolution occurred in a stormy and desperate time of barbaric world war, poverty, hunger, and insurrection. The demands propelling it were simple: peace, land, and bread.Read More »

The Great October Revolution: Prison And Punishment

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Countercurrents.org | November 28, 2017

PKT3207 - 225418 PETROGRAD: Soldiers of the Keksgolm Regiment in 1917.

Russia’s tsar regent Boris Godunov exiled, as punishment, a 300-kilogram copper bell to the Siberian town of Tobolsk, in the east, from Uglich in 1591. The exiled bell had to cover a distance of 2,200 kilometers. The bell’s crime: to the tsar regent, the bell appeared as a symbol of political unity of the rebel residents of Uglich. The bell, before its journey to exile, was punished with 12 lashes, and its “tongue” was also tore down. The insurgent Uglich people were ordered to pull the bell across the Ural Mountains to Tobolsk. The military governor of Tobolsk registered the bell as “the first inanimate exile”. The Uglich Bell, by the mid-nineteenth century, emerged as the sovereign’s symbol of supreme authority and vindictive power. Lede of Daniel Beer’s The House of the Dead, Siberian Exile under the Tsars (Allen Lane, London, 2016) describes the incident cited here.Read More »

‘‘Revolution that saved Russia’’

by Aleksandr Rodgers

Frontier | Vol. 50, No.22, Dec 3 – 9, 2017

In ‘the history of mankind there were many many revolutions. But for all written history, only three of them were officially given the prefix “Great” : Great French revolution, Great American revolution, and Great October socialist revolution.

Even the British bourgeois revolution of Cromwell didn’t receive such a title, despite its scope and value.Read More »

The Great October Revolution: The Peasants Perish

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Countercurrents.org | November 18, 2017

russian-peasant-workers

“[I]n this open step the sheep wander from Asia into Europe, and the Kirgiz shepherd drives them back again into Asia without knowing that he has crossed a geographer’s frontier.”

Thus describes Geroid Tanquary Robinson a part of Russia in Rural Russia under the Old Regime, a History of the Landlord-Peasant World and a Prologue to the Peasant Revolution of 1917. (Chapter I: “Serfdom and the earlier servile wars”, University of California Press, Berkley & Los Angeles, 1960)Read More »

The Great October Revolution: The Languishing Labor

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Countercurrents.org | November 15, 2017

russian-revolution

The tsarist Russia, the empire-system for which a section of today’s intellectuals feel love, was experiencing rapid capitalist expansion and growth till the World War I. Absence of profit wouldn’t have driven capitalists to the expansion. And, labor pushes up growth. And, having profit is impossible without toilers’ strained muscles and wet brows. And, the Great October Revolution is by the toilers.Read More »

The Great October Revolution

The languishing labor

by Farooque Chowdhury

Frontier | November 22, 2017

The tsarist Russia, the empire-system for which a section of today’s intellectuals feel love, was experiencing rapid capitalist expansion and growth till the World War I. Absence of profit wouldn’t have driven capitalists to the expansion. And, labor pushes up growth. And, having profit is impossible without toilers’ strained muscles and wet brows. And, the Great October Revolution is by the toilers.

Thus, toilers’ tale is essential to grasp the Revolution, the political process loved by the commoners while hated by the upper-class-brain. It – the toilers’ transcript – is a fundamental element required to evaluate the original “sin” Lenin and his Bolshevik “band” committed. Ignoring the toilers in the Revolution enables many theoreticians to equip themselves with “enlightened rationality” – bourgeois languorous concepts in the sphere of politics, an area full with conflict. Their purpose is to blind people so that people fail to define the Revolution aimed at achieving advancement in people’s lives.   Read More »