The Discarded Soldier

by Liam O’flaherty

People’s World | November 09, 2018

The Discarded Soldier

The “War to End All Wars,” like all the wars that have followed it, discarded human lives on all sides. Here, a German prisoner helps British wounded make their way to a dressing station near Bernafay Wood following fighting on Bazentin Ridge, July 19, 1916, during the Battle of the Somme. | Imperial War Museum

Introduction by Dr. Jenny Farrell of the Liam and Tom O’Flaherty Society

November 11, 2018 marks the centenary of the end of World War I. During that bloody slaughter, the propagandists described it as the “war to end all wars.” One hundred years and as many wars on, leaders of the nations of Europe and the U.S., many of them the authors and overseers of the present conflicts from Afghanistan to Yemen, are meeting in Paris to promote the so-called “Great War” as something noble.

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The Soundtrack of the Sixties Demanded Respect, Justice and Equality

by Michael V. Drake

The Wire | November 07, 2018

The Soundtrack of the Sixties Demanded Respect, Justice and Equality

Bob Dylan. Credit: Xavier Badosa/Flickr CC BY 2.0

When Sly and the Family Stone released Everyday People” at the end of 1968, it was a rallying cry after a tumultuous year of assassinations, civil unrest and a seemingly interminable war.

“We got to live together,” he sang, “I am no better and neither are you.”Read More »

‘A Picture of Dorian Gray’ speaks of obsession with beauty and youth

by Ed Rampell

People’s World | September 02, 2018

‘A Picture of Dorian Gray’ speaks of obsession with beauty and youth

Foreground, from left, Abe Martell, Tania Verafield and Colin Bates; background, from left, Frederick Stuart and Daniel Lench / Craig Schwartz

PASADENA, Calif.—Director Michael Michetti’s dramatic adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s 1890 Gothic novella The Picture of Dorian Gray, about the costs of eternal youth and beauty, is highly stylized and exceedingly strange. Large swaths of Picture border on avant-garde theatre, especially in Act II. The sinister plot and its presentation are likely to make some theatergoers uncomfortable (leave the kiddies at home for this one!) and to enthrall others as a most apropos choice for the Halloween season.

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How Harry Potter made imbeciles out of an entire generation

by Prakash Kona

Pambazuka News | July 21, 2018

Exhibition World

The last 20 years is globally the Harry Potter generation—a generation that has made a philosophy of life out of wishful thinking; the narcissism of the young stemming from a class that can afford and choose to remain imbeciles, we owe it to Harry Potter novels and films among other things. 

What makes this generation of youth particularly self-centred is that they have allowed themselves to be indoctrinated by social media, television and films.

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Radical roots of the superheroes

by Alex Mitchell

Morning Star | March 02, 2018

Cosplayers dress up as Marvel Comics characters Photo: William Tung/Creative Commons

BATMAN, Superman and Wonderwoman first saw the light of day in the late 1930s and it was in 1940 that Timely Comics – Marvel Comics’ predecessor — launched Captain America. Illustrated by Jack Kirby and written initially by Joe Simon and later by Stan Lee, it went on to sell 1 million copies a month.Read More »